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Descriptions

Please note that not all of these papers are offered every term; details of some papers given in the following pages may change.

10.501 Language Skills for Academic and Business Purposes

This is the first of two complementary papers which develop the language skills needed to cope with the broad spectrum of content found in the core interdisciplinary papers. This paper focuses on productive use of general, business and academic vocabulary across the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing.

This paper has been designed to be learner-centred in order to maximise personal development and growth. Self-directed study is therefore an important component, which enables students to take responsibility for their own learning. This is complemented by class work, which will encourage interaction between students and teacher and will include group and partner work to promote learning from peers.

10.502 Development of the Communication Process

This is the second of two complementary papers which develop the language skills needed to cope with the broad spectrum of content found in the core interdisciplinary papers. It focuses on the further development of productive use of general, business and academic vocabulary across the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing.

This paper has been designed to be learner-centred in order to maximise personal development and growth. Self-directed study is therefore an important component, which enables students to take responsibility for their own learning. This is complemented by class work, which will encourage interaction between students and teacher and will include group and partner work to promote learning from peers.

10.505 Introduction to Language and Communication

This paper is the foundation paper for a major in Language Studies with special reference to TESOL. It provides a brief introduction to the study of language, and is aimed to explore a number of language-related matters, including the uniqueness and origin of human language, its structure, acquisition and issues of language and society (matters of linguistic politeness and gender issues, regional and social dialects; multilingualism; language attitudes; the maintenance, shift, loss, and spread of languages; and the impact of modern technology).

10.510 Introductory Degree Study Skills

This paper is designed to enable students to study at a degree level more effectively and with greater success. There will be a strong focus on the required vocabulary, comprehension and reading skills needed to study at an entry degree level. It will provide students an awareness of the language skills, study skills and effort needed to succeed at degree level. It will focus on training students to listen to and understand lectures over long stretches of time, read academic texts with degree-level understanding, how to write and give presentations for academic purposes, and how to discuss academic topics.

10.511 Intercultural Communication

The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity.

The very fact of being a student at IPU New Zealand means you have some experience in communicating across cultures. This paper draws upon your experience and common sense understandings, and provides an academic framework to analyse such cross-cultural encounters.

It examines cultural and linguistic factors influencing communication in a wide range of contexts and looks at situations in which intercultural miscommunication arises. Issues such as world views and value systems, non-verbal communication, address systems, greetings, taboos and euphemisms are considered. Personal cultural experiences are drawn on to reinforce theory. You will learn to recognise ethnocentrism and cultural differences, with a view to functioning more effectively within intercultural contexts.

10.512 Contemporary Short Stories

This paper is an introduction to the genre of the short story in English, through the study of works by leading contemporary authors from a variety of cultural backgrounds. By examining stories from different perspectives, you will gain insights into the writing process, and the effect that culture has on writing.

This paper will help you to:

  • Assess the quality of specific stories

  • Understand the stringent demands required of writers, if short stories are to be successful

  • Analyse the difficulties encountered in attempting to write a short story.

By the end of the paper, you should be able to answer these questions:

  • To what extent have you increased your reading competence?

  • How much has your ability to recognise themes and identify cultural backgrounds improved?

  • Has your appreciation of short stories increased as a result of trying to write one of your own? What did you learn from this process?

10.513 Professional Communication

Prerequisite: Native speakers of English or at the discretion of the Dean

This paper takes an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the English Language. Students are expected to improve their writing skills through classroom activities and reading/writing tasks in various genres. This practice is directed toward enhancing their overall academic English skills with a focus on business communication skills.

10.514 Communication in the Globalised World

Prerequisites: Nil

This paper continues to develop language and conceptual skills, and allows students to expand their receptive and productive repertoire in different language genres within academic, literary, popular and business domains. It aims to equip students with a command of English at graduate level which will allow them to operate in the globalised world. Students compile a portfolio of work around themes of personal interest and according to individual need and learning style preferences.

10.604 English Skills 6: English for Professional Purposes

The only way of finding the limits of the possible is by going beyond them into the impossible” – Arthur C Clarke

This paper prepares you for the realities of the workplace in the English-speaking world, and helps you to gain competence in those areas that employers consider valuable in an employee. Topics include curriculum vitae and cover letter writing, techniques for conducting formal job interviews, the writing of feasibility reports, and the creation of funding proposals.

You will:

  • Develop career relevant skills which include CV’s, business letters, job interview techniques, business reports and funding proposals

  • Identify the importance of English communication in the workplace through meetings and negotiations

  • Give an oral presentation and defence of the findings, conclusions and recommendations of a business report or funding proposal

  • Research current issues faced by an organisation, and compile a feasibility report that proposes solutions to address these issues.

10.515 The Study of Language

This course looks into the principles that underlie the way human languages operate with the particular focus on English. It is suitable for anyone who wants to improve their awareness of the system of the language and expand their knowledge of English grammar. It is also a recommended course for those who are majoring in TESOL and Language Studies and are planning to get a Trinity CertTESOL qualification.

612 Asia Pacific Cultures Through Literary Texts

Culture is to know the best that has been said and thought in the world.’

Matthew Arnold

The paper compares and contrasts the cultural values and beliefs of different communities from the Pacific Rim, by means of literary texts: stories, poems, autobiography and extracts from novels. Works studied include the New Zealand European writers – Mansfield, Sargeson, Frame and Marshall, Maori writers – Grace and Ihimaera, Australian writers – Carey and Keneally, Aboriginal writers – Davis, Noonuccal, Sykes, Morgan, Johnson and Dodson, Japanese writers – Mishima, Kuniko, Endo, Korean writers – Chongmo and Park Wan-suh, and Chinese writer Jung Chang.

613 Film Studies

We learn to be active and critical viewers of film in this paper, which explores the history, technology and international phenomenon of the medium of visual story-telling through film. We are also introduced to hands-on practical and creative film-making techniques.

We take an analytical and thematic approach to films and briefly cover topics such as narrative, cinematography, montage, mise-en-scène, genre and auteur/authorship study, the role of ideology, the role of music, computer-graphics imaging and special effects, advances in film techniques, censorship, issues of production and consumption, supply and demand, for which we discuss a wide range of films, from older classics to popular releases, developing skills of observation, critical analysis and personal reflection. We also consider national cinemas, film industries and production houses, major film styles/movements/trends and figures in the development of film, key directors and actors.

Questions we work on include …

  1. How do we watch a film? Why do we watch a film? What is the film director trying to tell us?

  2. What are the main criteria by which we judge and review a film? Beyond the emotional and entertainment reasons for watching a film, what makes a film excellent or exceptionally special in the way that it communicates a story to its audience? What are the deeper messages in this medium that the director has planned, intended or arranged into the fabric of her/his film?

  3. How readily can we deconstruct the many ways in which a film has been put together, from the range of decisions about the use of the camera, to the techniques used to edit (montage) the film shot at various locations, assisted by the crew and the cast?

  4. In what form and manner have films changed and varied in the 100 years around the world in different cultures and languages since the medium was introduced as moving pictures?

  5. How is film content classified and for what reasons? Why are some films cut, censored or banned?

  6. How well can I think about how (through speech, gestures, dress and costume) the characters communicate, and can I find out more about the actors who play these characters?

  7. How well can I present my work using well-designed computer-assisted Word documents? Can I use PowerPoint well to help communicate a mix of text and images about my film research to my audience?

614/10.711 English as an International Language

You may take this paper at either level 6 or level 7, but not both. The paper takes an interdisciplinary approach in the investigation of linguistic, historical, cultural, technological and socio-political factors associated with English as the language of international communication in the 21st century. It encourages critical discussion of English in its historical, sociocultural and political context covering the following:

  • The emergence and spread of English

  • The functions, uses and implications of English as a lingua franca

  • The impact of English and its future in a global world

  • The current debate on English in the world

  • Varieties and variation vs. standards and standardisation

  • English in postcolonial contexts

  • The teaching of English.

615 Creative Writing

This paper is a workshop course in writing poetry, short stories and life writing, which also involves looking at the writing of others, both New Zealand and internationally. Students will be exposed to the different elements of writing and guided through readings to show how they are applied. Students will analyse the writing techniques used by established writers and other students’ writing. They will apply this analysis when giving oral and written critique on other students’ work. Students will be given feedback on their drafts and will rework their writing in response to this. There will be a number of set exercises to expose students to the imaginative and linguistic possibilities of literature.

616 Introduction to Language Teaching

Prerequisite: 10.515

This paper looks at the principles underlying second (and foreign) language learning and explores the ways in which theoretical principles can be applied to practice. Matters related to classroom and task-based teaching are discussed in detail.

  1. Introduction to Language Learning

Prerequisite: 10.515

This paper is suitable for anyone who wants to improve their awareness of how languages are acquired. It explores the processes involved in learning first and second languages, including the study of bilingualism. The sociocultural aspects are discussed in detail.

10.711 English as an International Language

See 10.614

10.712 Literature and the Land

Prerequisite: 10.512 or 10.612

Landscape shapes culture’ – Terry Tempest Williams

The paper compares and contrasts attitudes toward land held by people from different communities in New Zealand, Australia, the Pacific, Kenya, Nigeria, Ghana, Nunavut and others, through the study of cultural, historical and literary texts, including stories, poems, autobiography and extracts from novels.

Works studied include New Zealand European writers – Batistich, Sargeson; Maori writers – Ihimaera, Grace; Australian writers – Morgan, Oodjeroo, Davis, Mudrooroo, Katona; Pacific writers – Keju-Johnson, Niheu, Wendt, Hau’ofa; African writers and European writers on Africa – Ngugi, Kenyatta, Saro-Wiwa, Okri, John Pepper Clark, Armah, Awoonor, Conrad, Blixen; writers on Nunvut or the Inuit – Pelly, Mander, French.

10.713A Introduction to TESOL – A

Teacher: One who carries on his education in public. – Theodore Roethke

10.713A is the first of two papers designed to introduce you to the methodology and techniques of language teaching. We compare and contrast the conceptual basis for the language and language acquisition of English learners. We use case studies as practical examples of the interdisciplinary nature of language studies. This involves observation and supervised teaching practice in actual language classes. You will become a reflective teacher, able to think critically about teaching and learning, and in particular, to make ongoing improvements in your own teaching practice.

Theory sessions focus on the underlying principles of language teaching:

  • Language teaching methodology How should I teach? Is there a “best” way?

  • Analysis of language skills What do we need to know to speak a language?

  • Materials development How can I adapt textbooks or design my own materials?

  • Learning a new language What do beginning language learners experience and how can this inform my teaching?

In teaching practice sessions, you will begin by observing videos, and observing and assisting in live language classes. You then begin to teach short class segments, and these will gradually become longer. You will also work one-to-one with a learner.

10.713B Introduction to TESOL – B

Prerequisite: 10.713A

Teachers affect eternity; they can never tell where their influence stops.

Henry Adams (adapted)

Teaching Paper B builds on Paper A, helping you to deepen your observation and teaching skills and allowing you to pursue an area of your own interest. Again, we use case studies as practical examples of the interdisciplinary nature of language studies. You will continue to develop your language awareness and improve your understanding of grammar, vocabulary and pronunciation. You will also continue to learn by doing, and by reflecting on your practice.

10.714 Teaching Young Learners

Prerequisite: 10.713A

This paper introduces you to the methodology and techniques appropriate for teaching a second language, such as Japanese and English, to young learners (between the ages of five and twelve). It aims at providing you with a theoretical framework and a set of teaching principles for teaching and evaluating young language learners. We compare and contrast the conceptual basis for the language and language acquisition of young English learners using case studies as practical examples of the interdisciplinary nature of language studies. It involves a period of observing and evaluating teaching and learning, in addition to supervised teaching practice. You will also develop techniques for self- assessment of your teaching practice.

10.715 The Structure of Modern English for TESOL

Prerequisite: 10.611

The paper provides a full introduction to English sounds, grammar, and vocabulary and investigates the importance of a knowledge of the structure of English for teaching and learning (pedagogy). This paper is addressed to advanced undergraduate (and graduate) students interested in contemporary English, including those whose primary area of interest is English as a second language, primary or secondary-school English education, English literature, theoretical and applied linguistics, etc.

20.501 Contemporary Japanese 1: Speaking & Listening

Co-requisite 20.502

This paper is the introduction of Japanese language. It aims to develop communicative skills with emphasis on speaking and listening Japanese at an introductory level. The students are required to participate in group and pair activities in class as well as individual language development through the use of self-directed learning materials including CAL.

20.502 Contemporary Japanese 2: Reading & Writing

Co-requisite 20.501

This paper is co-requisite with 20.501 and it aims to acquire the basic Japanese writing skills. The students are required to acquire Hiragana and Katakana as well as basic Kanji. It is essential to participate in all the class activities and to develop strong and independent self-study skills to achieve these fundamental writing skills.

Contemporary Japanese 3: Speaking & Listening

Prerequisite 20.501 or equivalent, co-requisite 20.504

This paper further develops the basic Japanese skills and it aims to develop communicative skills with emphasis on speaking and listening Japanese. The paper is essential for those who want to achieve the level of proficiency necessary to prepare for bridging to a pre-intermediate level. The students are required to participate in group and pair activities in class as well as individual language development through the use of self-directed learning materials including CAL.

Contemporary Japanese 4: Reading & Writing

Prerequisite 20.502 or equivalent, co-requisite 20.503

This paper is co-requisite with 20.503 and it aims to consolidate the basic reading and writing skills so far acquired and to develop further language skills. The students in this paper must achieve the mastery of Hiragana and Katakana reading and writing, and are required to participate in group and pair activities in class. Individual language development through the use of self-directed learning materials including CAL is strongly recommended.

20.505A-D Japanese Skills 1A-1D

Prerequisites: 20.503, 20.504 or equivalent

These four papers integrate interaction with native speakers outside the classroom to help students learn and apply different ways of communication. Students are also exposed to real life language use through authentic materials such as magazines, videos and manga (comic books). Vocabulary, grammatical structures and the writing system are taught through the functional use of everyday Japanese.

20.506A-D Japanese Advanced 1A-1D

Prerequisites: 20.505A-D

These four papers are similar in approach to the techniques and methods used in 20.505A-D, but are offered at a higher level.

20.509A English to Japanese Translation 1

Prerequisite: Native speaker of Japanese, or JLPT 2 or equivalent

In this paper you learn the basic skills and attitudes required for commercial Japanese-to-English translation. Commercial translation requires the ability to read and understand Japanese source texts plus the ability to communicate well in English. You will therefore be expected to have a high level of Japanese comprehension and strong English composition skills. No particular background in business or engineering is assumed, but you are expected to gain basic understandings of these areas as you go along.

By the end of the paper you will have an understanding of basic techniques for approaching Japanese translation, stylistic considerations for common subject matters, tools to aid the professional translator and an awareness of best practices for the professional translator.

20.511 Japanese Civilisation 1

In this paper we examine the major areas of traditional culture and thought that have contributed to the development of Japanese achievement and influence in the contemporary world. The paper aims at giving an overview of the factors and influences that have helped create Japanese society as we know it today. The six time periods that will be focused on are: Pre-1600s, Tokugawa (Edo) Era, Meiji Era, Pre-war/ WWII Era (1912-1945) Occupation Era (1945-1952), and the Post-war Era (1952-

present). Within each time period, we look at the political, economic, social and cultural developments within Japanese society.

You will gain an overview of the history, society and culture of the major periods throughout Japanese historical development, and have an understanding of the indigenous and imported influences on change and continuity in Japan, which have led to Japan’s importance in the world today. You will be able to use this knowledge to think about the processes that contributed to the development of your own culture and society.

20.512 Japanese Business l

This paper introduces a wide range of information to help the students understand the business behaviour of Japanese company workers. The students in this paper will learn practical aspects of Japanese work culture in a variety of perspectives; practical knowledge and manners required in the workforce in Japan, such as characteristics of work behaviour, linguistic features in and outside the working environment. The content of this paper includes interdisciplinary features in which Japanese business and its position in relation with globalisation will also be discussed.

20.513 History of Modern Japan

This paper examines modern Japanese history, society and culture. It investigates the unique characteristics of contemporary Japanese society and how they have developed. Special attention is given to the roots of contemporary Japanese economic, political, and social systems and what influence the country has had from neighbouring countries and Western countries. Some knowledge of Japanese language is preferable.

  1. Contemporary Japanese 5: Speaking and Listening

Prerequisite: 20.503 or equivalent; Co-requisite: 20.602

This paper is to introduce the students to pre-intermediate level of Japanese speaking and listening skills. It aims to build up topic-based vocabulary and phrases while learning new syntaxes to acquire various methods of expression. Interactive group and pair activities are encouraged and individual language development through the use of self-directed learning materials including CAL is strongly recommended. The students are required to take initiative to clarify their own individual learning objectives. The students in this level should aim to achieve JLPT (Japanese Language Proficiency Test) Level 4.

  1. Contemporary Japanese 6: Reading and Writing

Prerequisite: 20.504 or equivalent; Co-requisite: 20.602

This paper is to introduce the students to pre-intermediate level of Japanese writing and reading skills. The students in this paper need to learn 150 basic Kanji as well as Kana-majiri reading and writing. It also aims to learn new syntaxes to acquire various methods of expression. Individual language development through the use of self-directed learning materials including CAL is strongly recommended. The students are required to take initiative to clarify their own individual learning objectives. The students in this level should aim to achieve JLPT (Japanese Language Proficiency Test) Level 4.

  1. Contemporary Japanese 7: Speaking and Listening

Prerequisite: 20.601 or equivalent; Co-requisite: 20.604

This paper further develops the four communicative skills, with emphasis on speaking and listening skills. The students in this paper prepare for bridging to an intermediate level. It aims to build topic- based vocabulary and phrases while learning new syntaxes to learn various methods of expression. Interactive group and pair activities are used and individual language development through the use of self-directed learning materials including CAL is strongly recommended. The students are required

to take initiative to clarify their own individual learning objectives. The students in this level should aim to achieve JLPT (Japanese Language Proficiency Test) Level 4.

  1. Contemporary Japanese 8: Reading and Writing

Prerequisite: 20.602 or equivalent; Co-requisite: 20.603

This paper further develops the four communicative skills, with emphasis on writing and reading skills. The students in this paper prepare for improving to a higher level of Japanese and need to learn 250 basic Kanji with Kana-majiri reading and writing. The students will also learn new syntaxes to acquire various methods of expression. Individual language development through the use of self- directed learning materials including CAL is strongly recommended. The students are required to take initiative to clarify their own individual learning objectives. The students in this level should aim to achieve JLPT (Japanese Language Proficiency Test) Level 4.

  1. A-D Japanese Skills IIA-IID

Prerequisites 20.503, 20.504 or equivalent

These four papers build on work done in Japanese Level I papers, integrating interaction with native speakers outside the classroom to help you learn and apply different ways of communicating. You are also exposed to real life language use through authentic materials such as magazines, videos and manga (comic books). Vocabulary, grammatical structures and the writing system are taught through the functional use of everyday Japanese.

  1. A-D Japanese Advanced IIA-IID

Prerequisites: 20.504A-D or equivalent

These four papers build on work done in Japanese Advanced I papers, using similar techniques and methodology.

20.609A English to Japanese Translation 2

Prerequisite: paper 20.509A

This paper builds on the basic translation skills acquired in paper 20.509A.

20.611 Japanese Civilization 2 Not currently offered

This paper discusses the contribution of language, literacy and education in the development of

Japanese civilisation. We focus on the development of the Japanese writing system, the growth and development of Japanese literary styles and works of art throughout history, and language, education and popular culture in the twentieth century.

20.612 Japanese Business 2

This paper introduces the present situation of the Japanese economy in the eyes of Japanese business corporations, known as Kaisha. The highly integrated workforce of Kaisha has demonstrated the ability of engaging their ultimate standards of quality in mass manufacturing which led the country to be one of the largest economies in the world. In this paper, we will examine the overview of Kaisha under the current economic situations, and the mechanisms of the long- lasting deflation in Japan as a possible remedy for the stagnant economy which will be illustrated from various aspects of economic theories. What Japanese business needs to do to overcome its structural problems under the globalisation will also be examined.

20.613 The Political Economy of Japan Not currently offered

  1. Contemporary Japanese 9: Speaking and Listening

Prerequisite: 20.603 or equivalent

This paper further develops the four language skills, especially communicative skills. It aims to enable the students to gain confidence in communicating in Japanese in common situations that people encounter in everyday life. Interactive group and pair activities are used and individual language development through the use of self-directed learning materials including CAL is strongly recommended. Students are required to take initiative to clarify their learning objectives. The students in this level should aim to achieve JLPT (Japanese Language Proficiency Test) Level 3.

  1. Contemporary Japanese 10: Reading and Writing

Prerequisite: 20.604 or equivalent

This paper further develops the four communicative skills, especially writing and reading skills. The students need to learn basic 350 Kanji with Kana-majiri reading and writing. It aims to enable the students to read and write short paragraphs explaining their ideas and opinions with accurate syntax and gain confidence in communicating skills in common situations that people encounter in everyday life. Individual language development through the use of self-directed learning materials including CAL is strongly recommended. Students are required to take initiative to clarify their learning objectives. The students in this level should aim to achieve JLPT (Japanese Language Proficiency Test) Level 3.

  1. Contemporary Japanese 11: Speaking and Listening

Prerequisite: 20.701 or equivalent

This paper further develops the four communicative skills, especially, formal language for daily life situations, such as sending messages, customer inquiries, and giving a formal talk. The Japanese language is sensitive to situations where social hierarchy exists; therefore, the mode of the language always requires participants to distinguish between formal and casual language forms. A lot of practice of speaking outside the classroom is strongly recommended. The students are required to take initiative to clarify their learning objectives. The students in this level should aim to achieve JLPT (Japanese Language Proficiency Test) Level 3.

  1. Contemporary Japanese 12: Reading and Writing

Prerequisite: 20.702 or equivalent

This paper further develops the four communicative skills, especially, formal language for daily life situations, such as writing messages, customer inquiries and requests. The Japanese writing style is more restricted and rigid in its form than its spoken language and it is also sensitive to the situation where social hierarchy exists, therefore, the mode of the language always requires participants to distinguish between formal and casual forms. The students are required to take initiative to clarify their learning objectives. The students in this level should aim to achieve JLPT (Japanese Language Proficiency Test) Level 3.

  1. A-D Japanese Skills 3A-3D

Prerequisite: 20.603, 20.604 or equivalent

These papers are for those who have completed all the prerequisite level-7 papers (20.701, 20.702, 20.703, 20.704) and need further development of language skills. The paper(s)’s aim is to consolidate the language skills so far acquired and to develop their understanding of ‘language mode’ and

‘language use’ in the appropriate manner. The students in this level should aim to achieve JLPT (Japanese Language Proficiency Test) Level 2.

  1. A-D Japanese Advanced IIIA-IIID

Prerequisite: 20.704 or equivalent

These papers are offered for those who need to improve their Japanese language skills for specific purpose(s) and/or in a focused skill area(s) that need to improve to a further advanced level. The students in this level should aim to achieve JLPT (Japanese Language Proficiency Test) Level 2.

20.709A English to Japanese Translation 3

Prerequisite: paper 20.609A

This paper builds on the skills acquired in paper 20.609A. By the end of the paper, you will:

  • be able to produce accurate and attractive English to Japanese translations on a range of general topics

  • be able to read specialized texts selected from the areas of business

  • be able to undertake comprehensive research on other selected subjects

  • be motivated to further your studies on a variety of issues.

20.709B Japanese to English Translation 1

Prerequisite: IELTS 7.0 English for Japanese students; Level 2 JL Proficiency Test for non-Japanese students

This paper teaches the basic skills and attitudes required for commercial Japanese-to-English translation. Commercial translation requires the ability to read and understand Japanese source texts plus the ability to communicate well in English. You therefore need to have a high level of Japanese comprehension and strong English composition skills. No particular background in business or engineering is assumed, but you are expected to gain basic understandings of these areas as you go along.

By the end of the paper you should be conversant with:

  • Basic techniques for approaching Japanese translation

  • Stylistic considerations for common subject matters

  • Tools to aid the professional translator

  • Best practices for the professional translator.

20.711 Social Conflict in Modern Japan

Students are advised to have already taken 20.511

The purpose of this paper is to introduce you to present-day Japanese society from the perspective of social conflict, ie Japan’s significant social problems and issues. Typically, these problems or issues are not only found in the five major social institutions of Japan: 1) marriage and the family; 2) education (eg bullying, learning issues); 3) work (eg worker alienation); 4) government (eg bribery);

5) religion (e.g deviant cults such as Aum Shinrikyo) – but also in such special topic areas as organised crime (yakuza), youth deviance (violence, larceny, teenage prostitution (enjo kosai), youth motorcycle gangs (bosozoku), drug abuse, the justice system and correctional facilities, discrimination (minority groups, sexism, ageism) and urban and environmental issues.

20.713 Japanese Foreign Policy

This paper investigates contemporary Japanese foreign policy with a special reference to security issues. Based on a diplomatic history review from Meiji Restoration to the Post-Cold War era, this course examines the core values and main practices in Japanese foreign policy in particular reference to security issues. It examines the bilateral relationship between Japan and the United States established upon their security alliance since the 1950s. This paper also discusses the Japanese pacifist Constitution, the Japan Self-Defence Forces, and its recent security role in the regional and international issues. With its increasing economic power, Japan has actively participated in various international regimes and contributed to the governance of global issues. This course focuses on Japan’s agenda on UN reform and its role in UN peacebuilding to demonstrate Japan’s attempt to achieve the status of political great power in the world arena.

30.501 Principles of Economics Core compulsory

Economics has always been part of our lives as scarcity exists almost everywhere. This paper is

designed to help students understand scarcity and aid them in identifying ways in which the use of individual and collective resources of the economy can be efficiently utilised for maximum social and economic growth.

The first part of this paper, Microeconomics, will provide students an understanding about the forces of demand and supply, which affects market outcomes. It will also show students the role of government in the market system, which can solely address problems like externalities but can sometimes produce distortion in the market.

The second part, Macroeconomics, will provide students insights into the dynamics of national economy as it will discuss macroeconomic issues such as growth, inflation, unemployment, interest rates and exchange rates. Current policies and their effect on these issues will also be discussed.

30.502 Statistics

This paper aims to provide a basic understanding of statistics. In this paper students learn about probability distributions, measures of central tendency, inferential statistics techniques for hypothesis testing and multiple linear regression. The paper focuses on developing the numeracy and quantitative analysis skills that students will be able to use in their coursework and their interdisciplinary projects.

30.503 Financial Accounting

The aim of this paper is to introduce students to the principles and practice of Financial Accounting. Students will acquire an understanding of how the accounting discipline facilitates managerial decision-making, both on a daily and long-term basis. This paper will mainly deal with the concepts underlying the preparation, interpretation, and analysis of accounting financial statements, as well as the market analysis of capital market ratios involving accounting numbers. Introductory concepts behind environmental accounting will also be discussed.

30.513 New Zealand Business Law

Prerequisite: 30.501

This paper introduces students to New Zealand Business Law. It offers an opportunity to interpret and apply various laws governing the structure and conduct of business organisations and financial markets in New Zealand. The paper also covers the topics related to international trade and commercial law, in particular, laws and regulations that govern trade in goods, services, foreign investment, intellectual properties, and transportation.

30.514 Business and Sustainability

This paper introduces key concepts and tools essential for developing sustainable business in the 21st century. Motivations for developing environmentally sustainable business practices are examined and how environmental sustainability contributes to successful business is explored. Pertinent case studies focusing on best practice in environmental sustainability and demonstrating opportunities for business in countering environmental challenges are introduced and discussed.

30.602 Fundamentals of Corporate Finance

Prerequisite: 30.511

This paper introduces concepts, tools, techniques, and practical applications to learn about corporate finance.

30.603 Management Accounting

Prerequisites: 30.503

This paper covers the role and application of management accounting in organisations. Students will develop an understanding of how management accounting helps in the decision-making process of today’s managers, especially in the areas of problem solving, planning and control. This paper is intended to provide adequate coverage of the content required as per academic requirements for professional qualifications of the Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand (CA ANZ) and CPA Australia Programme.

30.611 The Asia-Pacific Business Environment

Prerequisite: 30.501

This paper introduces you to the business environment of the Asia-Pacific region. While the focus is on business and industry, the interdisciplinary topics of politics and government, the environment, society and culture will also be included for a comprehensive understanding of the Asia-Pacific region.

30.616 The Business of the Environment

Prerequisites: 40.501 or 30.514 or 40.511

This paper presents an integrative and holistic approach to the increasing human use of the world’s resources. Topics include the definition and history of the exploitation of global resources, the general economics of resource use and the characteristics, problems and potential associated with the commodification of resources such as forests, food, biodiversity, energy, minerals, water, ocean and the atmosphere. Emphasis is placed on case studies and field trips to illustrate the topics.

30.622 Investment Management

Prerequisites: 30.501 and 30.503

This paper provides knowledge about the basic concepts, theories, and tools used by the professional investment managers. It will help understand why people invest, what various markets for alternative investments are, how to measure the rates of return and risk for alternative investments, and what are various methods for valuation of investments and comparing their performance in the short-and long-run.

30.623 Auditing

Prerequisites: 30.501 and 30.503

This paper covers the nature and purpose of auditing and the regulatory and professional environment in which it operates. It includes the development and practice of audits of a financial report, with insight into the fundamental role of auditors, the influence on audits, and related issues.

The practice of auditing is explained in the context of auditing theory, concepts, accounting information systems, and current practice. This paper is intended to provide adequate coverage of the material required for Auditing paper as per academic requirements of the Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand (CAANZ).

30.624 Product Management

Prerequisites: 90.604

The objective of this course is to familiarise students with a wide range of activities centred around a product or product line. Key aspects of product strategy, decision making, product development and product management are discussed, as well as the associated responsibilities of the product manager. Students will also learn the theory of product management (PD) by looking at the applications of upstream product management and downstream product management. The delivery of the course will consist of lectures, discussions, video presentations, cases and group projects.

30.625 Organisational Behaviour

Prerequisites: –

This paper introduces students to the basic concepts, ideas and theories current in the study of organisational behaviour. It covers the study of individual behaviours within the organisation, the challenges of leading and influencing others, the problems and opportunities of group behaviour and the context in which behaviour occurs, including organisational structure and culture. The course is not only concerned with explaining and discussing the concepts but also with the ways in which students might develop in terms of their own effectiveness in working in organisations.

30.722 Financial Markets and Financial Institutions

Prerequisites: 30.511/30.503, 30.602

This is an advanced level paper examining the importance of the role played by financial markets and financial institutions in an open economy. You will develop a critical appreciation of the role of central banks, financial institutions and financial intermediaries for development of a country’s financial system.

30.723 Advanced Financial Accounting

Prerequisite: 30.511/30.503

This paper is concerned with accounting theory and identifying related contemporary issues. It discusses the various definitions of accounting theory and its role in the standard-setting process. Deductive and inductive approaches to accounting research will also be discussed. Agency theory is introduced, which leads to the examination of the main research directions occurring in current accounting research. The paper also covers capital markets research, which investigates the response of security prices to accounting information releases. Selected contemporary accounting issues such as social and environmental accounting and reporting, oil and gas accounting, leases, and issues in international accounting standard harmonisation will be discussed to highlight the challenges facing the accounting profession in today’s globalised world.

30.724 Marketing Research and Analysis

Prerequisites: 90.604, 30.502

This paper provides students with an introduction to the analytic framework required to understand consumer and business markets. Students will have the opportunity to explore research methods and the dimensions of marketing analysis and apply various tools or methods used in marketing research. The main emphasis of this paper is to enhance students’ skills in conducting marketing research and analysis and to develop students’ appreciation of how managers can use marketing

information for an organisation’s overall strategic planning and decision-making. Knowledge of these topics will help students to implement and evaluate marketing research during their professional career.

30.725 Operations Management

Prerequisite: 30.501

This paper examines the practical tools and techniques that enable the efficient use of an organisation’s resources. Topics include value chain/supply chain management, capacity management, scheduling, decision tools, quality tools and systems, facilities management, product/service development, benchmarking and world class quality performance. The aim of the paper is for students to understand functions of operations management and apply techniques to ensure efficient and effective provision of goods and services.

30.732 Quantitative Methods in Finance

Prerequisite: 30.501, 30.602

This paper deals with the mathematical and econometric techniques relevant to modern financial instruments and capital markets. It explores the application of quantitative analysis to the behaviour of financial markets, investment decisions and risk management. The aim is to give students an appreciation of the financial reasoning used in business activity, both domestic and global, as well as provide them with quantitative techniques and tools to solve complex business problems, and assist in financial decision making. The applied focus of this paper will cater to final-year undergraduate business students interested in studying the quantitative methods underpinning contemporary financial decision-making and financial research.

30.733 Taxation

Pre-requisite: 30.511/30.503, 30.501

The paper focuses on taxation and advanced issues in taxation. It starts off with the history of taxation and the New Zealand tax environment and goes on to the more advanced topics of taxation of income from business and employment, application of income tax, and GST rules applicable to New Zealand taxable entities in a range of situations. The paper also includes advanced topics of tax planning, tax avoidance and tax evasion, and contemporary issues around international taxation.

30.734 Entrepreneurial Marketing

Prerequisite: 30.501, 90.604

This paper is designed to provide students with the opportunity of understanding the importance of the entrepreneurship concept in marketing. It offers an extensive understanding of the nature of small business management and the applications required in the formation and management of a new firm. Students will undertake a small project for which they will develop a business plan using their own business idea throughout the course and explore various marketing methods “orthodox and unorthodox”. In addition, this paper introduces students to the concept of entrepreneurship, fundamental theories regarding the basis of entrepreneurship knowledge and the characteristics of an entrepreneur.

30.735 The Management of Multinational Companies

Prerequisites: 30.613/90.605

This paper is concerned with the management of international business operations with an emphasis on international managerial practices. It puts the practice of international management into context, outlining the environment in which the manager operates. It also takes a comparative approach,

contrasting the managerial practices found predominantly in Europe, the USA, Japan and the newly industrialised countries. These practices are reviewed in order to assess strengths and weaknesses in contributing to a firm’s survival, growth and profitability in the international environment.

30.742 International Financial Management

Pre-requisites: 30.501, 30.511/30.503, 30.602

This paper provides an understanding of the theory, institutions and environment of international finance, investment and management.

30.743 Advanced Auditing and Assurance

Pre-requisites: 30.511/30.503, 30.620/30.623

This paper will focus on knowledge of taxation rules in relation to New Zealand taxable entities in a range of situations.

30.744 Consumer Behaviour

Prerequisites: 30.502, 90.604

In this paper, students are given an overview of psychological knowledge as it pertains to capturing consumer insight. It includes a consideration of how the brain works, what factors influence consumer choice, and a critical evaluation of psychological assessment tools (including such diverse methods as online surveys, brain imaging, computerised reaction time assessment, and eye- tracking). The following major topics are covered: consumer behaviour, including attitudes, impulsive vs. deliberative purchase, psychographic profiling and assessment, brand loyalty, experiential marketing, self and identity, and product satisfaction.

30.745 Project Management

Prerequisites: 30.501

This paper introduces widely used critical path project management methodology and will examine the project management process including scoping and definition, planning and scheduling. It examines the management of stakeholders, teams and teamwork for projects, as well as working within the reality of an organisational context. It also introduces advanced topics such as earned value project control and managing changes to resources and time and develops leadership skills through exposure to real-world projects

40.501 Introduction to Environmental Sustainability Core compulsory paper

Whoever does not try, does not learn.’ – Jewish saying

This paper introduces many of the basic issues in environmental studies and discusses them with reference to the global environment. The first part of the paper introduces basic concepts in ecology; the second part examines environmental issues related to human interactions with our living environment. Critical thinking and system thinking skills are emphasized. Practical exercises support the written content and interdisciplinary case studies are used to illustrate different perspectives in international studies.

You will learn to:

  • Apply basic critical thinking skills in relation to environmental issues

  • Explain the basic principles of ecology and give examples of ecosystems and how they work

  • Describe the determinants of species distribution

  • Discuss threats to, and conservation of living resources

  • Demonstrate an interdisciplinary and international perspective in discussing environmental issues

40.511 The Human Environment

Our human environment includes interactions between humans, structures that people build, and activities which are part of survival and economic development. This paper introduces you to human populations and human environments around the world.

You will learn to:

  • Discuss human origins and major developments in human society throughout history

  • Describe patterns of global human populations and processes of population change

  • Discuss the importance of perception on human interaction

  • Describe the major elements of culture and discuss the importance of culture to humans’ interactions with each other and with the natural environment

  • Describe the main forms of urban structure and pattern, and discuss global trends in urbanisation

  • Describe and explain the links between the distribution of resources and development of industry around the world

  • Discuss political interactions at global and national levels, with particular reference to interactions involving the natural environment.

40.612 Environmental Monitoring and Assessment

Prerequisite: 40.501

Taught also at Level 7 [40.712]. Students may select only one of these papers.

40.613 Natural Disasters & Emergency Management

Prerequisite: 40.501

This paper examines the causes of, perception of, and responses to, natural disasters around the world. Types of natural hazards covered include storms, earthquakes, volcanoes, mass movement, floods, tsunami and drought. Case studies are used to illustrate the impacts of disaster, and the various responses by communities and governments to reduce the impact of natural hazards.

By the end of the paper, you will be able to:

  • Explain the concept of ‘natural hazards’, and why the threat of natural hazards is increasing globally

  • Discuss the potential variety of responses to natural hazards

  • Describe the physical processes involved in major forms of natural hazard

  • Discuss the risks related to different forms of natural hazard

  • Discuss case studies illustrating specific approaches to mitigation and management of natural hazards

  • Describe a model for disaster planning

40.614 Biological Conservation

Prerequisite: 40.501

In this paper we learn about protecting the world’s plant and animal species and outline why there are so many species currently threatened with extinction. Firstly, we try to put a dollar value on an animal or a plant – what are they worth? We then look at the threats to biodiversity – the

destruction, fragmentation, and degradation of habitats, overexploitation, diseases, and introduced species. We next look at the problems associated with small populations and how to establish new populations. Finally, there are the practical applications – establishing, designing, and managing protected areas, and also outside protected areas. What we can do to help? Our field trips include visits to Pohangina Valley and the Kapiti Island and Karori wildlife sanctuaries.

40.615 Regional Environmental Systems and Management

This paper introduces students to a number of the major issues, problems and solutions of regional scope. The paper emphasises the importance of the regional environment to modern life. Additionally, the regional areas are central for solutions to environmental issues. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, students will analyse a number of contemporary environmental issues looking at how some regions are leading the way in developing sustainable solutions to current challenges.

40.616 Urban Environmental Systems and Management

This paper introduces students to a number of the major issues, problems and solutions in urban environments. The paper emphasises the importance of urban areas to modern life and how the city is the centre of economic and creative life. Additionally, urban areas are also central for solutions to environmental issues. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, students will analyse a number of contemporary environmental issues looking at how cities are leading the way in developing sustainable solutions to current challenges.

40.712 Biological Conservation

Prerequisite: 40.501

See 40.614

40.713 Global Environmental Issues

Prerequisite: 40.501

This paper presents an integrative approach to environmental issues of global scope such as population growth, land and biological degradation, global warming, and freshwater depletion. The roles of international agencies, government, business and non-government organisations in resolving these environmental problems are explored. There is a focus on the role of international environmental law in addressing global environmental problems. We will discuss:

  • Various multinational treaties addressing environmental issues

  • International problems in terms of managing global commons

  • Resource depletion and orthodox economics

  • Examples of global environmental issues in relation to international law identifying inadequacies in existing law

  • International environmentalism and non-government organisations and their impact on resolving global environmental problems

  • The ethical and legal liability of states for damage caused beyond their borders

  • The ethical and legal liability of businesses for damage to the environment

  • The interrelationships between the biological, physical, political, economic and cultural components that are active in determining the nature and extent of international environmental issues

  • International environmental issues presently or potentially significant

  • The legal and institutional mechanisms through which global issues are addressed

  • The effectiveness of international agencies in resolving global environmental problems

  • The effectiveness of international law in solving global environmental problems

  • Basic international environmental monitoring needs

40.717 Environmental Monitoring and Assessment

Prerequisite: 40.501

This paper introduces multidisciplinary analysis of biological, physical and social impacts of both proposed and existing human activities. Approaches, procedures and methodologies of environmental impact assessment in different countries and contexts are compared. Public participation in both preparation and reporting is covered. Various case studies are examined in detail with attention to mitigation strategies.

You will:

  • Discuss the different approaches to environmental impact assessment

  • Discuss the various procedures and methodologies for assessing the physical, biological and social impacts of proposed and existing human activities

  • Consider the characteristics of a competent environmental impact assessment

  • Be able to deliver competently and defend the results of an environmental impact assessment before a critical audience

50.501 Introduction to International Relations Core compulsory paper

What happens in the field of International Relations (IR) affects all our lives. The more we

understand this area, the more sense we will be able to make of the global events that surround us every day. This paper helps us to evaluate the conflicting messages we hear from politicians, action groups, big business and the media, and look past the headlines and the slogans to the political patterns beneath and the history that helped shape them. It will help us become ‘globally competent’ and more able to influence the course of international relations ourselves. Our approach emphasises interactive and applied learning. You will have the opportunity to specialise in a topic of your choice, and view it through the different lenses the course will open up week by week.

Key questions:

  • How do International Relations affect us?

  • What are the major “theories” of International Relations? How useful are they in explaining the world around us?

  • Is our world primarily a world of conflict or a world of cooperation?

  • What is globalisation? How is it affecting our lives?

  • How can we reduce global poverty and inequality?

Tackling these questions will play an important part in helping you grow towards the IPU New Zealand graduate student profile. For example, a core component of this paper is the ability to access information and evaluate a range of opinions. Similarly, you will learn to think critically as you gain experience in recognizing and analysing various political stances. You will also have plenty of opportunities to listen to the often very different views of students from other countries, and as you choose your specialist area, you will be gaining experience in setting realisable goals and systematically applying what you are learning to your chosen topic.

50.514 New Zealand – East Asian Relations

This paper considers the development of New Zealand’s own identity on the world stage through the establishment of its relationship with Asia. The path of New Zealand’ s diplomatic relations with Asia

is charted and an examination made of the way public perceptions of the importance of security and trade have influenced relationships. The impact of the wider Pacific Rim is taken into account, in particular the implications of the New Zealand/USA relationship for New Zealand’ s relations with the East Asian region. Special attention is paid to the political, economic and environmental concerns addressed by the expanding roles of regional groupings.

By the end of this paper, students will be able to:

  • Describe the structure of New Zealand’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs and how it fits in to the government and administration procedure of New Zealand

  • Describe the development of New Zealand’s links with East Asia and place them in context with other events in New Zealand’s political history

  • Discuss New Zealand’s shifting strategic and defence links with Asia

  • Analyse shifts in the public perception of Asia and relate them to changes in diplomatic relationships

  • Explain the growth of economic links with Asia with reference to contemporary political links

  • Make realistic assessments of further developments which may be possible in New Zealand- East Asian relations

Readings:

Publications of the New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade and the New Zealand Institute of International Affairs.

50.515 Introduction to Political Studies

We are all affected by what happens in the political world. This paper is an introduction to that political world and its events. This is a chance to look behind events and analyse them in the context of history, ideas, human behaviour and global events. We will study basic political ideologies like democracy, nationalism, various political theories, political representation and leadership. By understanding these fundamental concepts, it is hoped that you are able to analyse and seek your own answers to explain what you see and hear in your daily lives. Throughout the course, you will also develop skills to critically examine materials through various sources.

What are the key questions this paper will help me answer?

  1. What are the prevailing political ideologies in the world?

  2. What are the histories of these political ideologies? How do these political ideologies affect us now?

  3. How have political systems evolved from these ideologies?

  4. Are these political ideologies relevant to the world today? Do we need to develop new ideologies for this century?

  5. How have the developing and developed world fared in the current political world?

50.611 Human Rights

If you watch any international news bulletin today, the chances are high that it will refer to human rights issues of some description. And then there are all the “hidden” stories – the ones that rarely hit the headlines, the ones that often concern women and children. Human rights groups tell us that at least one in three women in the world will suffer serious violence in their lifetime, while armed conflict has killed 2 million children in the last decade and seriously injured or permanently disabled as many as 6 million. There are no easy answers, but this course will help us understand the bigger picture on the issue of human rights.

What are the key questions this paper will help me answer?

  1. What are human rights? Are they the same for everyone? Who decides?

  2. Are some rights more important than others?

  3. Has thinking on human rights changed in your country in recent years? Why/why not?

  4. What connections are there between globalization and human rights?

  5. How did colonization affect human rights? In what ways are these effects still with us?

50.612 Politics of the Free Market

If you put the federal government in charge of the Sahara Desert, in 5 years there’d be a shortage of sand.’ – Milton Friedman

Capitalism, wisely managed, can probably be made more efficient for attaining economic ends than any alternative system yet in sight, but… in itself, it is in many ways extremely objectionable.’ John Maynard Keynes

This paper is an introduction to international political economy (IPE). It helps you to understand principal actors in IPE such as individual states, international financial institutions, the markets, and multi-national corporations and how they interact with one another (with what consequences) in the ever-changing world dynamics. To achieve this, we consider core theories of IPE and apply them in empirical analyses of current events and issues.

You are expected to develop the following skills and abilities in this paper:

  • A sound understanding of international political economy (especially the intertwined relationships between politics and the market)

  • An understanding of the relevant key theories and ideas, and how they can be successfully applied to real events and trends

  • The ability to search and attain relevant information through various sources (including the internet)

  • The ability to analyse and evaluate the collected information in a critical manner

  • The ability to construct and present logical oral and written arguments

  • The ability to assess given problems and propose viable solutions after careful examination of their likely outcomes.

50.613 Politics of the Environment

Prerequisite: Nil

This paper aims to give students an understanding of the concept of sustainability, especially in the developing world. The importance of aid flows to the development of the world’s more disadvantaged countries and the significance of development which does not rely on the unchecked exploitation of natural resources are discussed.

North/South politics and the need for a global approach in dealing with development and environmental safeguards are examined. Case studies are drawn from the Pacific region and elsewhere.

50.615 South East Asia

South East Asia is a fascinating region, and presents those interested in International Relations with a number of puzzles:

  • In terms of political arrangements, race, language, religion, geography, culture, and history, it is amazingly diverse. Yet its constituent states have managed to achieve a surprising level of cooperation in recent years.

  • Most of the region’s states were subjected to colonial rule. Yet many former South East Asian colonies have since developed strong, globalised economies.

  • The region sits right next door to a huge and rising world power, China. Yet its states are currently managing this relationship with a large degree of success.

In this paper, we will be asking how South East Asia has achieved these successes, and what lessons they can teach the rest of the world. As the region’s leaders frequently challenge orthodox “Western” views on international institutions, globalisation, democracy, and human rights issues, we will also spend some time examining both sides of these debates, and finding out what each side can learn from the other.

As an integral part of the paper, you will have the opportunity to specialise in a political aspect of South East Asia of your choice, and view it through the different lenses the course will open up.

What questions will this paper help me answer?

  1. Which factors played the biggest role in shaping the South East Asia we know today?

  2. What is the global importance of South East Asia?

  3. How does the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) work, and why is it important? In what ways is it changing?

  4. What patterns can we see in the South East Asian response to economic and political globalization?

  5. How do the South East Asian states manage their relations with China? With the US?

50.616 North East Asia

In this paper, we will be looking at the global importance of North East Asia, and the changing roles of its key players. North East Asia is a key world region. It encompasses three of the globe’s most important state actors, whose roles have changed significantly since the end of World War 2. One of these powers is the world’s most populous state, whose growth into a heavyweight economic player was recently described as the “central reality in Asia” today. Another has been adjusting to a new role in international affairs since the end of the Cold War. The third is currently – and controversially

– seeking a role on the UN Security Council. Their relations with each other, and with the US, the world’s number-one superpower, are crucial to the peace and stability of the whole Asia-Pacific region, and indeed of the world beyond. Commentators have noted that the Cold War has not totally ended in North East Asia, and the region contains several potential flashpoints as well as historical enmities that still have a profound effect on regional relations.

What questions will this paper help me answer?

  1. Why is North East Asia important for my country?

  2. Which factors played the biggest role in shaping the North East Asia we know today?

  3. How is Russia adapting to its new world role?

  4. Should a rising China be seen as a threat to regional peace or an engine of regional economic growth?

  5. What role has Japan played in international relations since World War 2, and how likely is it that this role will change?

  6. How are the major North East Asian powers managing their relations with the US?

50.711 War and Peace: Security and Stability

Some aspects of the topic of war and peace seem depressingly constant. Clashes of interest and security dilemmas caused problems for ancient civilizations just as they do today, and we are still a long way from a peaceful world. But today’s conflicts are not just replicas of yesterdays, and our increasingly globalised era opens up new prospects both for cooperation and conflict. An ever denser network of global communication, for example, can be a factor in promoting either. A daunting array of transnational problems, from terrorism to escalating environmental degradation, can drive nations to new levels of cooperation or become powerful new potential causes of strife. As global norms and values shift, the resulting landscape offers grounds for both hope and fear.

In this paper, we use history and International Relations theory to work out frameworks to approach these debates, but we will also try to keep continually in mind that war and peace are not just abstract issues. They profoundly affect humanity and our planet, and demand active, engaged responses from each of us. Throughout, our class time will emphasise interactive and applied learning. A core element is the opportunity to specialise in an area of your choice, and use the different perspectives offered by the paper to shed new light on your topic.

Key questions:

  1. Is war inevitable?

  2. What is peace?

  3. What has changed over time and what remains constant in the causes of war and the prospects for peace?

  4. Is growing interdependence more likely to be a force for peace or a cause of conflict?

  5. Is democratisation the answer to world conflict?

  6. How can we promote peace?

Tackling these questions will play an important part in helping you grow towards the IPU New Zealand graduate student profile. For example, a core component of this paper is the ability to access information and evaluate a range of opinions. Similarly, you will learn to think critically as you gain experience in recognising and analysing various political stances. You will also have plenty of opportunities to listen to the often very different views of students from other countries, and as you choose your specialist area, you will be gaining experience in setting realisable goals and systematically applying what you are learning to your chosen topic.

50.712 Foreign Policy in the Information Age

Foreign policy is one of the tools governments use to promote what they perceive to be the values and interests of their societies in the context of the wider world. As other governments have always similarly sought to promote their – often competing – values and interests, this has never been an entirely simple process. But an increasingly integrated global environment adds yet further levels of complexity. As we unpack the idea of foreign policy, we will gain a better understanding both of the hard choices that have always been an integral part of policy making and of the new challenges and opportunities posed by the information age. The approach will emphasise interactive and applied learning, and you will have the opportunity to specialise in a foreign policy area of your choice, and view it through the different lenses the course will open up.

Key questions:

  1. Which internal and external factors and players influence the way states formulate foreign policy?

  2. Foreign policy is informed by the way states perceive their values and interests. How do states determine what these are?

  3. Which values and interests drive the foreign policy of the United States? Of China? Of New Zealand? Of your country?

  4. What differences has the information age created for the foreign policy environment? Are these positive or negative?

Tackling these questions will play an important part in helping you grow towards the IPU New Zealand graduate student profile. For example, a core component of this paper is the ability to access information and evaluate a range of opinions. Similarly, you will learn to think critically as you gain experience in recognising and analysing various political stances. You will also have plenty of opportunities to listen to the often very different views of students from other countries, and as you choose your specialist area, you will be gaining experience in setting realisable goals and systematically applying what you are learning to your chosen topic.

50.714 Politics of Environmental Sustainability

This paper aims to challenge students to think about the underlying causes of the current global environmental crisis, and how solutions to this may be found. The influence of politics, both domestic and international, is considered in terms of how it may have contributed to the crisis and also how it might provide a means by which solutions can be found. The influence of other related issues such as unlimited economic growth, population growth, poverty, water and food shortages, and a decline in natural capital is also examined in this paper.

By the end of the paper students will be able to:

  • Describe the present state of the world environment

  • Assess the gravity of global environmental problems and identify underlying causes

  • Discuss the politics behind natural resource use

  • Analyse the role that business and the market can have in reducing or enhancing natural capital

  • Suggest means by which some of these global issues may be resolved by examining models for sustainable development, alternative technologies, people power; and the political will to change

70.521 Mandarin 1: Speaking and Listening 1

Prerequisite: 70.521

This is a beginner level paper that introduces sounds and tones unique to the Chinese language. Interactive group and pair activities are encouraged. The paper is designed to help students to master Chinese pronunciation and develop simple conversation and interpreting skills. The paper also includes an introduction to Chinese culture and heritage.

70.522 Mandarin 2: Reading and Writing 1

Prerequisite: 70.522

This is a beginner level paper, taking an integrated approach involving reading, writing, translation skills, and simple grammatical structure. Students will learn basic vocabulary about family, nationalities, occupations, seeking directions, and how to express gratitude and regret etc. They will also learn compound Chinese characters originating from basic characters. The paper also introduces aspects of Chinese culture and heritage.

70.523 Mandarin 3: Speaking and Listening 2

Prerequisite: 70.521

This paper is for students who have successfully completed Mandarin 1: Speaking and Listening 1 or those who can demonstrate an equivalent level of proficiency. It is designed to strengthen and continue to develop students’ existing knowledge of Chinese to a pre-intermediate level by covering the requirements of listening proficiency at HSK Level 2. Emphasis is placed on development of interpreting skills and communicative skills needed in everyday contexts. The paper also provides further introduction of Chinese culture and heritage.

70.524 Mandarin 4: Reading and Writing 2

Prerequisite: 70.522

This paper is for students who have successfully completed Mandarin 2: Reading and Writing 1 for those who can demonstrate an equivalent level of proficiency. It is designed to strengthen and continue to develop students’ existing knowledge of Chinese by covering the requirements of reading proficiency at HSK Level 2. There is an emphasis on development of translating and writing skills. The paper introduces a larger number of Chinese sentence structures and characters, and will further explore Chinese culture, customs, and habits.

70.611 Chinese 3 (Mandarin)

Prerequisite: 70.523 and 70.524

This paper helps you to develop your communicative skills in Mandarin from elementary to pre- intermediate level. It aims to explain grammatical structures used in everyday Mandarin. There is emphasis on development of reading, writing, listening and speaking skills needed in every context. The paper also provides the opportunity for further study of the cultural heritage of the Chinese people.

You will develop your:

  • Everyday conversational skills to help you use Chinese accurately in a range of social settings, for example, how to get to school and what subjects you take; visiting the doctor

  • Comprehension of everyday speech and practical conversation, for example, understanding daily information from various topics such as planning for a holiday; taking photographs; a birthday invitation

  • Productive use of the essential grammatical structures of everyday spoken Mandarin, for example, writing postcards, letters and a diary

  • Reading ability on a variety of everyday topics, for example, a short story; a journey timetable

  • Integrated writing of Mandarin in formal written language texts, for example, writing an essay using the correct frequency Chinese characters.

80.501 Introduction to Tourism

Tourism is like a birthday, full of the excitement of a new discovery.

Do you like to visit new places? See the natural wonders of the world? Visit World Heritage Sites? Enjoy the challenge of communicating in a language different from your own? If travel excites and inspires you then this is the paper for you. Learn about the industry that employs 9% of all workers globally and is the third largest by turnover.

This paper presents an introduction to the tourism industry. It introduces you to the tourism product and allows you to consider the interrelationships within and outside the industry. Tourism planning and the impacts of tourism are covered and the future directions of tourism are discussed.

Questions we consider include:

  • Where does the money I spend as a tourist go?

  • What are the effects of tourism on host communities?

  • Who are the groups of people that are ‘behind the scenes’?

  • When are the best times to travel?

  • How do I become skilled to be part of this global industry?

80.502 Introduction to Ecotourism

Is ecotourism the future of tourism in New Zealand and the world?

Is environmental sustainability the greatest threat to ‘modern’ tourism?

This paper serves as an introduction to the theory and background of the ecotourism industry. We discuss:

  • The development and structure of this complex and dynamic new industry

  • The current and future state of the local and international ecotourism industry

  • Demographic, socio-cultural and economic factors, and how these influence decision-making about tourism activities

  • The roles and responsibilities of government and legislations in shaping the tourism industry and its performance

  • The roles of local communities and the natural environment in the development of effective ecotourism products

  • The growing importance of technology and its influence on the industry in the near future

Questions we discuss include:

  • What is ecotourism?

  • Does tourism eventually destroy what the tourists came to discover?

  • Is ecotourism the answer to this possible destruction?

  • What is the relationship between sustainable development, sustainable tourism and ecological tourism management?

  • Why are technologies like energy efficiency, ‘green’ building, waste management and environmental management policies important in ecotourism?

  • Do you want to be an ecotourism guide?

  • What skills, qualifications and experience do ecotourism guides require to work in the industry?

  • What are the problems and future for a developing New Zealand ecotourism industry?

80.601 Ecotourism and Protected Natural Areas

Pre-requisites: 80.502

In this paper, we explore the economic, social/cultural, political, and environmental implications of sustainable tourism in protected areas. Drawing on international case studies but with an emphasis on New Zealand national parks, reserves and other protected natural areas, this paper will also give you greater insight into the recreational potentials and limits of these fragile spaces.

You will complete this paper with the ability to provide well-informed answers to the following questions about protected natural areas

  • What defines a protected natural area and why are these areas important?

  • What is their relationship to ecotourism?

  • What kinds of ecological, economic, socio/cultural and political factors should be considered in their planning and management?

  • Who is most likely to utilise them and for what reasons?

  • What issues should be addressed in visitor and site management?

  • What role does government policy play?

  • What content and format should information be communicated to visitors?

  • How should protected natural areas be designed to encourage sustainability?

  • Who are the stakeholders in protected natural area planning and management?

80.602 Ecotourism and Culture: Empowering Communities

Pre-requisite: 80.502

This paper explores intersections of indigenous worldviews and eco-tourism initiatives while emphasising the concept of culture. It combines tourism development theory with key cultural questions drawn largely from the anthropology of tourism and the anthropology of development.

By the end of this paper you should have formulated your own responses to the following questions:

  • Are ‘indigenous’ and ‘traditional’ legitimate terms and how are these used as tourism marketing tools?

  • Is your view of the world different from that of other indigenous peoples?

  • If indigenous peoples have different ways of knowing about their world, is this knowledge valuable in tourism development planning and implementation?

  • What are the dominant theories adopted by international institutions and NGOs involved in tourism development in developing nations and how do they affect indigenous peoples?

  • What kinds of tourists seek ecotourism experiences in ‘traditional’ cultural environments?

  • What are ‘ecotourists’ expecting from these experiences?

  • What are the effects of ecotourism and contact with ecotourists on local cultures and their livelihoods?

  • Is community-based ecotourism or mass tourism the best alternative to empower indigenous communities?

  • How can the tourism industry plan for and regulate culturally responsible tourism?

80.603 Ecotourism Internship

Pre-requisites: 80.601 & 80.602

This paper provides you with practical experience working in nature-based operations or other tourism businesses that have an interest in improving the sustainability of their operations. The total duration will be determined by the operator providing the experience and will be in the range of between six weeks to three or four months. You can opt for the practical component to run either during the Summer Term Year 2 or Year 3 Term 1.

By the end of the paper, you should have gained:

  • Higher level skills of analysis, critique, synthesis and problem-solving

  • A sound understanding of advanced issues in tourism and service management in the area of dissertation research

  • The ability to maintain currency in the relevant body of tourism and services knowledge through the judicious assessment of subsequent developments in the field

  • A deeper understanding of the tourism/ecotourism industry and made contacts that are likely to improve their employment prospects.

80.701 Ecotourism Planning

Pre-requisites: 80.602 & 80.603

In this paper we take an in-depth look at the current linkages between tourism and the ecotourism sector. We identify stakeholders, needs and assets and consider business planning strategies, product interpretation, programme design, programme implementation, marketing, evaluation and quality control.

On completion of the paper, you should be able to:

  • Identify specific activities and planning related to stakeholders’ responses to environmental opportunities and challenge

  • Identify a range of national and international resources available to ecotourism operators to enable them to enhance their performance

  • Evaluate by case studies how operators have dealt with specific competitive environments

  • Evaluate how new technologies can act as a decision support system for tourism business

  • Provide linkages between ecotourism theories and tourism practices

  • Understand and reflect upon the critical notion of tourist yield and how research tools can be used to enhance yield.

80.702 Ecotourism Interpretation

Pre-requisites: 80.602 & 80.603

Areas studied in this paper include ecotourism tour guiding; certification, training and experience; career paths for guides; leadership in outdoor settings; risk and safety management during activities; trip/activity planning; the interactive ecotourist; the role of interpretation; methods of interpretation in ecotourism settings; New Zealand’s natural and cultural heritage

You will also have the opportunity to perform a wide range of guiding skills through practical sessions out of class. This is a ‘taster’ paper for those interested in pursuing a guiding or leadership career in adventure-based ecotourism. However, all components of this paper are vital if you are to fully understand the operations of any ecotourism business.

80.703 Future Directions for Ecotourism

Pre-requisites: 80.602

This paper considers:

  • Ecotourism’s evolution from small-scale niche market to mainstream

  • Globalisation and ecotourism today

  • A greater focus on community development

  • Technology and ecotourism

  • Ecotourism hybrids: voluntary and educational ecotourism, travel ecology, and eco-cultural tourism

  • Emerging trends in marketing styles and strategies

  • Indigenous culture brokers

  • Grassroots political organisational activities

  • Evolving policies (government, NGOs and international organisations)

  • Social psychology of the tourist experience

  • The equitable distribution of ecotourism benefits

  • The foci of emerging ecotourism organisations

  • Evolving ecotourism business ethics, philosophies and strategies

90.501 Research and Study Skills 1 Core compulsory paper

This is a practical paper designed to develop the skills needed for study and to carry out primary research. It focuses on the subject of information systems in data collection, storage, analysis and presentation of data using both qualitative and quantitative approaches. In addition, you will write full research reports including such sections as analysis of results, discussion, findings, conclusions and limitations. You also learn how to use the library for secondary research and how to seek competent technical advice.

90.601 Research and Study Skills 2 Core compulsory paper

This paper provides further practical training in research techniques and methodologies with a focus

on secondary research. The first part includes approaches to research, critical thinking, evaluation of academic sources, research ethics, reviewing literature, planning a research project and selecting methods of data collection. Electronic referencing systems will be used and you will learn how to write a critique of a secondary research project, a literature review, a research proposal and take part in a viva oral examination.

90.602 Internationalism Core compulsory paper

International politics have been turned upside down in the past 15 years. The long-lasting bipolar

international system of the Cold War era has ended and a new global system is rapidly emerging. The fundamental dynamic of our epoch is said to be ‘globalisation’ – a phenomenon that is strongly affecting everything and therefore provokes a lot of academic and political controversy.

In this paper we examine the old Cold War system and the new globalisation system. The old theories and conceptual tools used to analyse the Cold War international system (such as Realism) are reviewed and critiqued. You are introduced to and engaged in the ‘globalisation debate’, considering the following questions:

  • What are the contending perspectives on globalisation?

  • How can we make sense of our new ‘globalised’ world politics and economy?

  • What are the new concepts, theories, issues, and problems of studying this?

  • How relevant are the old approaches used to understand international relations in the new era marked by the events of September 11, 2001?

  • Are the classical formulations of state sovereignty still relevant in the globalisation era?

  • What are the roles of the UN and NGOs in the global political system today?

  • What is the future of multilateral diplomacy and of international law in light of recent US unilateralism and the Bush doctrine of pre-emption?

We also explore global challenges such as free trade vs. fair trade, South-South cooperation, sustainable environment, poverty reduction, third world/global development, democratic governance, the impact of globalisation on indigenous people, and universalising human rights. It is hoped that, after completing this course, you will gain a usable conceptual framework to understand

world politics better and to be able to put global issues and events in perspective, especially in the post-Cold War, post-September 11, post-Iraq War world.

90.602A/B Professional Internship Project

This paper is designed to provide students with practical vocational work experience in order to strengthen and develop leadership, communication skills, problem solving capability, and their approach to effective teamwork. This paper provides students with the opportunity to gain direct experience in various settings (including businesses, non-governmental organisations, vocational/teaching, sports clubs, hospitality providers, and others). They will be encouraged to bring this knowledge back into the classroom to further enrich their knowledge of themselves and their future career.

90.604 Marketing Management

Prerequisites: Nil

This paper provides an overview study of marketing as an important area of business and encourages students to think critically of the marketing techniques across cultures. The overall design of the paper is intended to highlight the vitality of the modern marketing environment and to show how organisations address the needs of its local and global customers. A strong emphasis is placed on practical illustrations of marketing theories and concepts, and on the intercultural aspects of marketing necessary for building relationships with customers in different countries.

90.605 Organisation Management and Culture

Prerequisites: Nil

This paper provides an introduction to the essential aspects of managing business operations and the fundamental skills and roles played by managers in different cultural environments. It aims to provide an understanding of the basic management functions of planning, organising, controlling and leading and their applications across different countries. It gives both a historical perspective to the development of managerial thought and an understanding of the cultural environment in which the manager operates.

90.606 International Business

Prerequisite: 30.501 Principles of Economics

This paper deals with the impacts of cross-cultural influences, international political systems, legal restrictions, and trade barriers on international business. In addition, students will study the continual change in the international business landscape, and how innovative strategies are being used by multi-national corporations.

90.701A/B Interdisciplinary Project Core double paper

After learning in 90.501 and 90.601 how to formulate relevant questions, choose appropriate methodologies, collect and analyse data, and organise and present results, this paper provides practical experience in conducting an interdisciplinary research project. You work independently to integrate diverse aspects of an issue, although your work is supervised by a staff member with postgraduate qualifications related to your research area.

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